Which Eyewear is Best for You?

Help with selecting a frame
When selecting frames, remember that a proper fit is essential. Review the information below to help you find your perfect fit!

When selecting your new eyewear, some tips to consider include:

  • The frame should follow your eyebrow as closely as possible
  • Your pupil should be near the center of the frame
  • The frame should fit comfortably on your face without pinching or moving when you smile

Adults
Frames can also enhance the features and shape of your face. First, determine the overall shape of your face, then use the guide below to find the frame that enhances your features. Keep in mind that your face shape may be a combination of the ones described here.

Oval
An oval shaped face has a rounded forehead and chin of equal size. To maintain the natural balance, try frames that are as wide as the broadest part of the face. You may want to try geometric or round frames.

Round
A round face has full cheeks with a rounded chin and forehead. To sharpen facial features and make the face appear longer, try geometric-shaped (such as rectangular) frames.

Square
A square face has a broad forehead, cheeks, and chin, plus the width and length have the same proportions. To soften the angles of a square face, try rounded, oval, or cat-eye frames.

Rectangular or Oblong
A rectangular or oblong face has a long, narrow face. To add width to the face, try rounded or curved frames. Decorative temples will also add width to the face, and a low bridge will shorten a long, narrow nose.

Diamond
A diamond-shaped face has a small forehead, with wider temples that narrows around the jaw line. To minimize the width of the temples and highlight the eyes, try rimless frames or geometric frames such as oval or cat-eye shapes.

Base-Down Triangle
A base-down triangular face has a narrow forehead that widens toward the chin area. To emphasize the narrow portion of the face, try frames that have detailing on the top half of the frame, such as cat-eye frames.

Base-Up Triangle
A base-up triangular face has a broad forehead and narrow chin. To emphasize the cheekbones, try frames that are wider at the bottom. Rimless frame styles may also be an appealing option.

Children
There are many frames for children to choose from. When selecting children’s frames, you may want to consider some of these features:

  • Spring hinges help hold eyeglasses in place and may prevent the need for frequent adjustments
  • A lower bridge may better fit a smaller nose and keep frames from sliding down

Need Help with selecting lenses and lens options?

We know that choosing eyewear that is right for you can be a complex and confusing process. Once you have found that perfect frame, you still have to decide which lens and options to put into that frame. To help you with your decision, we’ve put together some of our members’ most frequently asked questions. Be sure to talk to your eye care professional concerning your personal needs and preferences.

Lens options to consider for you or your spouse

Lens options to consider for your child

Q. Which lens options are best for an active lifestyle?
A. 
Ask your eye care professional about polycarbonate lenses.  Polycarbonate lenses are made from a thinner, lighter material that offers better impact resistance than regular plastic lenses. Polycarbonate lenses also offer increased ultraviolet protection for your eyes.

For added protection and to prolong the life of your lenses, a scratch-resistant coating will be added. Our members enjoy standard scratch-resistant coating at no additional charge.

Q. Can anything be done to reduce the glare from lights, such as car headlights?
A. 
An anti-reflective coating will benefit you for both day and night.  These lenses are coated on both sides to reduce glare and will help you see better in all lighting conditions. They may also help to reduce glare when you use a computer.

For added protection and to prolong the life of your lenses, a scratch-resistant coating will be added. Our members enjoy standard scratch-resistant coating at no additional charge.

Q. Which options offer comfort and protection from the sun when I am outdoors?
A. 
Talk to your eye care professional about adding ultraviolet (UV) protection to keep your eyes protected from harmful sun exposure. In addition to UV coating, there are many different options you can choose to shade your eyes, including tint, photochromatic lenses, or mirrored coatings. Photochromatic lenses, also known as transitional lenses, automatically adjust depending on the lighting conditions. Activated by the sun, these lenses appear darkest when the sun shines brightest. 

If you spend a lot of time driving, outside, or around snow or water, polarized lenses might be an option to consider. Polarized lenses reduce glare and offer 100% UV protection.

Q. My work/hobbies take me in and out all day long; what can I do to avoid having to carry both my regular glasses and sunglasses?
A. 
Photochromic lenses, also known as transitional lenses, will automatically adjust from clear to a dark tint, depending on the lighting conditions. Photochromic lenses are now available in longer lasting, lighter weight plastic material.

Lens options to consider for your child

Q. Which lens options should I consider for my young child?
A.
Ask your eye care professional about polycarbonate lenses. Polycarbonate lenses are made from a thinner, lighter material that offers better impact resistance than regular plastic lenses. Polycarbonate lenses also offer increased ultraviolet protection.

For added protection and to prolong the life of your lenses, a scratch-resistant coating can be added. Our members enjoy standard scratch-resistant coating at no additional charge.

Q. Which lens options are best for my teen who plays sports?
A.
Ask your eye care professional about polycarbonate lenses. Polycarbonate lenses are made from a thinner, lighter material that offers better impact resistance than regular plastic lenses. Polycarbonate lenses also offer increased ultraviolet protection.

For added protection and to prolong the life of your lenses, a scratch-resistant coating can be added. Our members enjoy standard scratch-resistant coating at no additional charge.

Q. My teenager doesn’t like how thick his/her lenses are; what options are available to reduce the thick appearance?
A.
Polycarbonate lenses are the thinnest and lightest material available for eyeglass lenses. Adding a polished edge to the lenses will also aid in concealing any thickness extending beyond the frame edges. Be sure to ask your eye care professional to help select a frame and lens options that best suit your child’s individual eye care needs.